CBE205(39.205) Chemical Engineering Analysis

Prerequisite: MAS101 Calculus I & MAS102 Calculus II

Course Description
This class is an introductory course for basic mathematical analysis in various chemical engineering problems. Idealization of processes by differential balances are broadly applied to many chemical engineering problems, such as reaction kinetics in chemical reactors, reactant/product flow behavior in the process pipeline, heating/cooling of the system, separation/purification process of product mixture, and the control/optimization of the chemical engineering processes. For better understanding, proper assumptions with reasonable physical grounds simplify problems and allow insights for the analysis of chemical engineering problems. In this course, we introduce some basic mathematical skills to deal with process models. The course starts with classical methods for solving ordinary differential equations (ODE), followed by introducing how to deal with partial differential equations (PDE). We basically give emphasis to how to obtain analytical solutions of the chemical engineering problems. However, the approximation of an actual situation cannot always lead to analytical solutions and we deal with elementary numerical methods, too. We are trying to include various chemical engineering problems as many as possible in order for the students to understand why mathematical analysis is important in chemical engineering.

Schedule: Tuesday/Thursday 9:00~10:30AM at Creative 410. About 23 classes will be offered.
Office Hour: Appointment can be made by email.

Material for Teaching
- Main Textbook : Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Dennis G. Zill & Warren S. Wright, 4th edition.
- Auxiliary textbook : Applied Mathematics for Chemical Engineers (Wiley Series in Chemical Engineering)
by Richard G. Rice and Duong D. Do


CBE331(39.331) Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineering

Course Description
The objective of ‘Fluid Mechanics of Microsystem’ course is two-fold as the understanding of fluid with complex structure and fluid flow in micro channels becomes important in the field of biotechnology and nanotechnology.
First objective is to understand the basic principles in the physical phenomena of fluid mechanics found in most processes in chemical engineering, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Second objective is to strengthen the skills to apply these principles to the analysis, optimization and design of real processes.
In this course, we introduce the basic concept of continuum mechanics, conservation equation and Newton’s constitutive equation. Then, we deal with the analysis of Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis, creeping flow, boundary layer theory, turbulent flow, macroscopic balances and electrokinetic phenomena.

Frequency: Two classes a week with a 90-minute long lecture in each class.
Office Hour: Appointment can be made by email.

Material for Teaching
- Main Textbook : Middleman, S.: An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics: Principles of Analysis and Design,
John Wiley & Sons, New York (1998).

- References :
1. Wilkes, J. O.: Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers, Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 1999.
2. Denn, M. M.: Process Fluid Mechanics, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1980.
3. R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, Wiley, 2nd ed. 2001.
4. W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press, 1998.


CBE205(39.332) Heat and Molecular Transfers

Course Description
The objective of 'Heat and Molecular Transfer' course can be summarized as; First, students are guided to understand the physical phenomena in heat and molecular (mass) transfer observed in chemical and biological engineering processes. Second, the ability to apply these basic principles to the analysis, design and optimization of the real processes is practiced. In this course, basic principles of molecular (mass) transfer will be studied first. Then, following these principles, steady and unsteady molecular diffusion will be studied. Convective transport of molecules will be studied for laminar flow if fluid flow is involved. For heat transfer, basic principles of heat transfer will be studied and then steady and unsteady heat conduction will be studied based on basic principles. Convective transport of heat will be studied for laminar flow if fluid flow is involved. If time is permitted, natural convection, condensation, radiative heat transport will be covered.

Material for Teaching
- Main Textbook : S. Middleman, An Introduction to Mass and Heat Transfer - Principles of Analysis and Design
John Wiley & Sons, 1998. Introduce new problems.
- Auxiliary textbook :
1. R. B. Bird, W. E. Stewart and E. N. Lightfoot, Transport Phenomena, Wiley, 1960. Classic text for transport phenomena.
Not easy to read. Almost everything is covered.
2. W. M. Deen, Analysis of Transport Phenomena, Oxford University Press, 1998.


CBE623(39.623) Recent Topics in Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering: Introduction to thin film Technology

Prerequisite: As a multi-disciplinary course, the course is open to all graduate students who are interested in thin film technologies.

Course Description
This class is an introductory course for basic thin film technologies and their current research trends. A thin film is a basic building block of a variety of devices including, but not limited to transistors, optical devices, data and energy storage devices, and sensors. The development of thin film technologies had accelerated the performance of the devices in last decades the properties and the performance of devices are significantly influenced by both the materials and the deposition processes of the thin films. The class aims at the balanced understanding of thin film materials and processes and the applications thereof.
The class consists of 1) thin film processes, 2) thin film materials, 3) patterning processes, 4) surface chemistry, and 5) their applications to devices. The class is highly multi-disciplinary and we anticipate a wide interest from all the engineering departments, including chemical, mechanical, materials science, and electrical engineering.

Frequency: Two classes a week with a 90-minute long lecture in each class.

Office Hour: Tues, Thurs 2:30~3:00PM, or appointment can be made by email.

Textbook: Handouts will be distributed. Other reading materials and references will also be posted/distributed.

Grading Policy: Mid-term (30%), Final term (30%), Term Project (30%), attendance (10%)